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And then there was the weather.

Grand Jury Resisters & What To Do About It

The State Of The Union Address is drawing near. Drone use is expanding from Pakistan, Yemen, and other countries harboring terrorists to our own. Last week, the City of Seattle declared they would not use drones on their own people. Not so in the rest of our country, and we have authorized killing our own citizens in order to purge the world of terrorist threat.

We will also hold citizens in detention, indefinitely, without charges, without explanation. This is a war on our citizens, a direct violation of our Constitution, made express during wartime.

Here’s what you can do—write letters to the Judges who can release these people, but send them to the lawyers, so they become public record.

http://slog.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2013/02/11/grand-jury-refusers-so-what-can-i-do-about-it

And here’s a good article from December, from Seattle’s The Stranger, giving the most thorough history and coverage I’ve seen in the American press.

http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/christmas-in-prison/Content?oid=15565849

Check out some new nonfiction at the beautiful journal The Common.

blondemajor:

always reblog

I would love these posters for my office. Or sheets. Everywhere.

(Source: ianbrooks, via losnadas)

The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction

Posted my review of this amazing book. It’s quite an accomplishment—beautiful, useful, intriguing, one of those books that goes on deepening. Can’t stop thinking about it.

http://blog.contrarymagazine.com/2013/01/review-the-rose-metal-press-field-guide-to-writing-flash-nonfiction/

Things you think you’re saying for the first time ever, have been said better before by Shakespeare, though they may need saying again.

Ken Kesey (via theparisreview)

World Aids Day

It’s a day of remembrance, of memories, all those lost ones. Larry Neuber, Jim Beale, Bob Burwell, Sylvester, Eric, Alex, Weird Terry. The hardware store guy. The bartender. So many people.

Some tried to ignore it, either out of fear or denial. In San Francisco, you could not ignore it.

Some days you would walk down the street and see it. Frail people, men with patches on their face, the sarcoma that came in later stages. Thin, gaunt men who used to be vibrant and muscular. So many people died, that if you hadn’t seen someone in a while, you stopped asking. Even though we all knew that silence equals death, you stopped asking.

We did what we could. Some of us marched, wrote letters, called the Mayor’s office, called our representatives. Julia volunteered with Shanti, a hospice group and Alex prepared food for home delivery.

We marched in silence. Bearing candles, walking shoulder to shoulder down Castro St and onto Market. The florist, Sanford the retired astrophysicist, close friends, faces you recognized, new faces, so many faces all looking forward, as if the light we carried would make a difference. For that brief time, it did. 

We felt strong when we marched. Not so alone, gray and gritty, bundled up in our scarves and leather jackets, our united purpose a temporary victory against an enemy that was so huge, an enemy both societal and bureaucratic, an enemy microscopic and invisible. An enemy anyone could carry.

Here’s to the ones we lost, the ones taken by surprise, the ones who fought. The ones we loved.

Election elation

Lots of great news from last night. And the press are talking about the African-American vote and the Latino vote, but the vote that changed things last night were white women, 65 years of age and older, specifically from the Midwest. (Binders full of women, anybody?)

But here in Washington State voters upheld a state law sanctioning same-sex marriage. Dan Savage blogged that this could not have happened without the “straights” and straight people donated money and time to fight for this right. And Governor Gregoire speaks of her change of heart on the issue when her daughters told her this was the civil rights issue of our time.

And I am looking forward to getting a few wedding invitations, some from couples who have been together for twenty years or more, because those I love are not straight or gay or queer, they are my friends, they are my family, and the time is now.

Ron Swanson, Philosopher

I haven’t posted in a while because I’ve been swamped with an extra class this quarter and so computer = work = nope. But today in class a student asked me if I am able to write and teach and have a family.

She says she wants to have it all.

And all I could think of was Parks and Rec, how Leslie Knope was working and campaigning for city council, and how she kept forgetting things, losing things in the cracks. Ron finally convinces her to take a leave of absence.

And in class, I said that sometimes you have to make choices. Then I did what I often do—quote someone else.

Ron Swanson says, “Never half-ass two things.  Whole-ass one thing.”

Sigur Ros, Seattle 2012. It’s always good to go to a show where the band is happy to be with each other. I like live shows, but this was transcendent. Also, there was no one in between me and the stage and the visuals of nautical and marine themed film interspersed with live video helped the otherworldly feel. It’s amazing that this weird band from Iceland singing in “Hopelandic” plays sold-out venues; no one in the audience sings along which makes for an almost reverent experience. Jonsi thanked the city of Seattle for plumbing—they haven’t played indoors for four years. It’s the least we could do.

Sigur Ros, Seattle 2012. It’s always good to go to a show where the band is happy to be with each other. I like live shows, but this was transcendent. Also, there was no one in between me and the stage and the visuals of nautical and marine themed film interspersed with live video helped the otherworldly feel. It’s amazing that this weird band from Iceland singing in “Hopelandic” plays sold-out venues; no one in the audience sings along which makes for an almost reverent experience. Jonsi thanked the city of Seattle for plumbing—they haven’t played indoors for four years. It’s the least we could do.

Connection/Disconnection

I’ve been on the road driving on freeways and highways sans a/c. At one point is was 112F inside the van. There were flying fish and dolphins and ravens and water and sun. I had no internet access most of the time and no cell phone access some of the time. I haven’t felt more connected with the present and my surroundings in a long while. Now I am home to a climate where no a/c is necessary, and I have all the technology a girl could need. But I am having difficulty with focus, with full presence, and need to reduce sensory stimuli. I think.

On another note, there are people here in town from far away that I would like to see. Josh—let me buy you a beer. Chelsea—let’s eat cheese. Anyone else that happens to be around, let’s meet, face-to-face. Digital is good, but so is analog.

Nº. 1 of  10